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The Permeability of Boundaries: on the origins of an image

August 6, 2015

Permeability

I cobbled together this image, showing a carved rock from Ilkley Moor bursting through a brittle surface, as the emblem of an archaeology conference I co-organised with my esteemed colleagues, Robert J Wallis and Kenneth Lymer, at the Department of Archaeology of the University of Southampton in December 1999. Called A Permeability of Boundaries?: New Approaches to the Archaeology of Art, Religion and Folklore, its fascinating range of papers was published in a volume a little over a year later (Wallis and Lymer 2001).

I believe the actual carved stone represented is the panel known as the Panorama Stone, though I can’t remember the source of the image I used. Using scissors and paste, I juxtaposed this with an image of a brick flying through a window that I’d found in an old issue of the anarchist paper, Black Flag, from the early 1980s, substituting the carved stone for the brick.

Image (94)

The conference emblem presents less a dynamic image of a projectile being lobbed through a window, more some submarine phenomenon emerging through a fractured layer of ice.

Reference

Wallis, Robert J. and Lymer, Kenneth (eds.). 2001. A Permeability of Boundaries?: New Approaches to the Archaeology of Art, Religion and Folklore. Oxford: British Archaeological Reports. BAR International Series 936.

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